Monthly Archives: October 2012

Is Obama Out To Destroy America? http://

Is Obama Out To Destroy America? http://bit.ly/QR7oZB  Obama Personifies Cloward-Piven Strategy October 26, 2012 What we called the Illuminati’s Brazil strategy was described in 1966 by two Marxist sociologists, Richard Cloward and Francis Piven. It involves bribing both individuals and … Continue reading

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An Israeli attack is risky And it might not even eliminate Iran’s nuclear facilities.

By Philip Giraldi Israel Defense Forces / Flickr During the Napoleonic Wars, when it was reported that the French were preparing to invade England, Admiral John Jervis said “I do not say they the French cannot come–I only say they cannot come by sea.” Barring the movement of a regiment of sans culottes across the English Channel by a fleet of Montgolfier balloons, the Jervis comment pretty much summed up the limits to French ambitions as long as Britannia ruled the waves. A similar bit of military overreach appears to be surrounding the alleged planning by the Israelis to stage an air assault on Iran’s nuclear facilities. The US media and even some Pentagon spokesmen have suggested that Israel cannot do the job alone, but the problem is much larger than that, leading to the question whether Israel can do it at all. Israel has over 400 fighters , but many of them are configured to establish air superiority over an opponent by shooting down opposing aircraft and disabling air defense facilities on the ground. They are fighters supporting ground operations first with a limited secondary capability as bombers. Israel has no dedicated bomber force but it does have an estimated 125 advanced F-15I and F-16I’s, which have been further enhanced through special avionics installed by the Israel Aircraft Industry to improve performance over the types of terrain and weather conditions prevailing in the Middle East. The planes are able to fly long range missions and very capable in a bombing role but they do have their limitations. It is generally agreed that any attempt to destroy the hardened and well-defended Iranian nuclear sites would require use of the United States-provided GBU-28 , a five thousand-pound laser-guided smart bomb that can be directed to the target. The GBU-28 is regarded as accurate and able to penetrate deep into a target, which is why it has been described as the “bunker buster.” Exact performance specifications of the weapon are classified, but it is believed to be able to penetrate twenty feet of reinforced concrete. Whether that would be enough to take out the expected Iranian targets at the research centers in Natanz and Fordow, the heavy water facility at Arak, and the operating reactor at Bushehr is unknown and some analysts have opined that it might require multiple hits on the same spot to do the job. As Bushehr, the most accessible target of the three, is an active reactor, an attack would release considerable contamination. Assuming that the US has supplied Israel with a sufficient supply of GBU-28s to go around to all the available aircraft, there remain two additional problems with the weapon that impact Israeli ability to stage an attack. First, it is so heavy that only Israel’s twenty-five F15Is are able to carry it, one bomb for each plane. For optimum use against a target, the GBU-28 also requires a clear line of sight, which means that the plane has to be flying low and relatively slowly, making the fighters more vulnerable to ground defenses, particularly with their maneuverability limited due to the bomb load. This first problem creates the second problem, which is that an attack will require a separate fleet of F-16 fighters unencumbered by GBU-28s to go in first and suppress the defensive fire, further complicating the mission. Assuming that all the Israeli fighters capable of carrying the GBU-28 are available, which would not normally be the case, twenty-five bombs might not be enough to do critical damage to the targets. Perfect intelligence is required to place the bombs where they will do the most harm, an element that will likely be lacking with the underground targets. Some bombs will miss while others might not function perfectly and will detonate before penetration. And before the bombs are dropped the planes have to arrive over Iran. Let’s assume that the Israelis opt for an attacking force of 50 fighters, one third of which would be designated for suppression of ground fire. The planes would be equipped with conformal fuel tanks built into the fuselages for extended range. They would also have auxiliary tanks that could be jettisoned when empty. Nevertheless, the attacking force would have to take off from Israeli airfields and then almost immediately refuel either over Israel or above the Mediterranean because fighters burn considerable fuel in getting off the ground. Refueling from Israel’s twelve modified Boeing 707 and C-130 tankers would take some time even though a plane using a flying boom for refueling can top up in thirty seconds. It is the maneuvering and connecting to enable the refueling that takes considerably longer. Refueling all 50 planes will be a major task essential to the success of the mission and while the planes are in the air and forming up they will be detected by radar in Egypt and Lebanon, information that one must assume is likely to be shared with Iran. The objectives in Iran are more than 1,000 miles from Israel and the planes must be able to spend some time over their targets, which is why the refueling is necessary. But even then there would be problems if the Israeli jets have to engage any enemy planes either en route or over Iran. They would have to drop their auxiliary tanks to take defensive action and would probably have to return immediately to Israel. There are three possible routes to Iran. One route to the south violates Saudi airspace and it is by no means certain that the very capable 80 plus F-15s of the Saudi Air Force would not scramble to intercept. The other is to the north over Syria, skirting the Turkish border. Syria is unlikely to be able to interfere much given its current troubles though it does possess some capable Russian made anti-aircraft missiles, but a Turkish response to possible airspace violations cannot be ruled out. The third and most likely option is to fly along Syria’s southern border, avoiding Jordan, and then through Iraq, which has only limited air defense capabilities since the US military’s departure at the end of 2011. Israel’s previous attacks on nuclear facilities in Iraq and Syria hit targets that were above ground while relying on the element of complete surprise. Upon arrival over Iran, the Israelis would be confronted by something quite different, targets that are deep underground or hardened with reinforced concrete and further protected by layers of ground defenses that will be alert and waiting. Iran is known to have batteries of Russian supplied SA-5s for high altitude targets and SA-15s for lower level attackers. Both systems are regarded as very effective. It has also been alleged that Tehran has been able to acquire advanced Russian S-300 long range missiles, which, if true, would pose a serious problem for the Israeli fighters. The Israelis would have to be very lucky to avoid losses. Assuming that the Israeli Air Force is able to carry out the refueling, fly successfully to Iran, suppress ground defenses, and carry out its bombing, it still has to return home, again flying over Iraq with every air force and air defense battery in the region on full alert. Depending on how much maneuvering was required while over Iran, some planes might well need to be refueled again which would mean deploying highly vulnerable tankers over Iraq or Jordan. Back at home the Israelis would have to expect volleys of missiles of all kinds and varieties launched by Hezbollah in Lebanon to retaliate for the attack. The US-funded Iron Dome defense missile system would intercept many of the incoming missiles, but some would certainly get through and Israeli civilian casualties could be high. It is clear that staging the attack on Iran would be fraught with difficulties and intelligence estimates suggest that at best the bombing would set back the Iranian ability to construct a weapon by only a year or two. Plus the attack would make certain that Iran would pursue a weapon, if only for self-defense, an essentially political decision that has not yet been made by the country’s leadership. Israel has other military assets–including ballistic missiles and submarine-launched cruise missiles–that could be used to attack Iran, that would invite retaliation from Iran’s own ballistic and cruise missiles, considerably complicating post-attack developments. There is also the Israeli nuclear weapons capability, use of which would invite worldwide condemnation and instantly escalate the fighting into a regional or even broader conflict. On balance, all of the above suggests that the frequently repeated threat by the Israeli leadership to attack Iran is not a serious plan to take out Iran’s nuclear sites. It is more likely a long running disinformation operation to somehow convince the United States to do the job or a deliberate conditioning of the Israeli and US publics to be supporti Continue reading

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A Lesson Our Leaders Should Learn From D

A Lesson Our Leaders Should Learn From Dama http://bit.ly/RjlNiJ An overview of the gift economy in West Africa, which is keeping cultural traditions alive and prioritzing people in the face of profit-propelled economic globalization.

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Petition For investigation and Review of Tagg Romney Owned Voting Machines

Department of Justice: Investigate Ohio Voting Machines owned by Tagg Romney By Alea Bankston ( Contact ) To be delivered to: Eric H. Holder, Jr., Attorney General and President Barack Obama PETITION STATEMENT Ensure that the election is not stolen and that the results are not tampered with or altered: Investigate voting machines owned by a company linked to Tagg Romney. Petition Background According to an article on PoliticolNews.com, Mitt Romney’s son, Tagg, has close financial ties to Hart InterCivic, the company that owns electronic voting machines that will be used in Ohio for this election. The article also alleges that these machines are easily hacked. Not to mention, it’s an obvious conflict of interest. Please sign this petition to get the Department of Justice to initiate an investigation into this issue before Election Day on November 6, 2012. Sources: “Tagg Romney Invested in Ohio Electronic Voting Machines,” Politicol News, October 21, 2012 http://www.politicolnews.com/tagg-romney-invested-in-ohio-electronic-voting-machines/#ixzz29rJxhKIE “Angst in Ohio about Bain, Romney donors links to voting machine company,” The Washington Post, October 23, 2012 http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/election-2012/wp/2012/10/23/angst-about-counting-the-votes-in-ohio/ SIGN THE PETITION Continue reading

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Eyes Wide Shut?, Humanities Last Stand,

Eyes Wide Shut?, Humanities Last Stand, Pedophiles, Alex Jones Covers Some Serious Topics http://bit.ly/VkZqI5 Eyes Wide Shut?, Humanities Last Stand, Alex Jones Covers Some Serious Topics

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There’s A Currency Manipulator That’s Bigger Than China

Source: Business Insider The buzz about currency wars and currency manipulation is back. In the last presidential debate, Mitt Romney called China “a currency manipulator for years and years,” and said that he would label the country a currency manipulator on his first day in office. Tonight’s debate is expected to focus even more on the China talking point. However, there is one country you won’t hear either candidate criticize tonight, even though it’s been intervening to prevent its currency from strengthening against the dollar as well: Israel. And when you look at Israel’s foreign exchange holdings as a percentage of GDP, you see that at 61 percent, Israel’s ratio is significantly higher than that of China, which stands around 45 percent. The chart below shows the Bank of Israel’s foreign currency reserves, which have ballooned since early 2008 when the central bank began buying up dollars and selling shekels . By selling shekels against the dollar, the BoI hopes to keep its currency from strengthening, making exports more competitive vis-a-vis dollar-based exporters like those in the United States. Bloomberg, Business Insider OECD economist Charlotte Moeser gave a brief history of the Bank of Israel’s recent interventions in a 2010 paper and explained a bit of the rationale behind them: In March 2008, the central bank began intervening in the foreign exchange market –for the first time since 1997 – stating that its goal was to increase international reserves up to 100% of short-term debt, as prescribed by the “Greenspan-Guidotti Rule.” At the time, foreign reserves (USD 29.4 billion) stood at 81% of external short-term debt. There was an initial unannounced intervention, which was followed by announcement of a schedule of foreign-currency purchases. At first, the bank purchased the equivalent of USD 25 million per day with a view to raising reserves to a value of USD 35-40 billion. In July 2008 the daily purchase was increased to USD 100 million, and in November the reserve target was raised to USD 40-44 billion. Moeser wrote that as a result of the BoI’s interventionism, markets assumed the central bank was secretly, but loosely, targeting a certain exchange rate: By March 2009, foreign exchange reserves had increased to USD 40.6 billion, nearly 100% of external short-term debt; and, relative to GDP, reserves had reached a very high level compared with other small open economies and with historical Israeli values. Nevertheless, the Bank announced that it would continue the intervention, and its press releases increasingly referred to concerns about the level of the exchange rate, rather than reserve levels. Regular intervention was finally stopped in August 2009, but a week prior to this the Bank announced a new policy of discretionary intervention. The Bank does reveal how much it purchases in monthly data on foreign-exchange reserves, and these confirm that intervention has continued. Markets now consider the Bank to have a “dirty float” policy on the exchange rate and speculate as to what its intervention price is. For instance, some observers believe this to be around 3.8 shekels to the US dollar. The chart below shows the U.S. dollar against the Israeli shekel over the past few years: Bloomberg, Business Insider Near the end of April 2011, Bank of Israel Governor Stanley Fischer gave an interview with the Wall Street Journal, right when the Shekel had appreciated against the dollar to levels not seen since mid-2008. At the time, Fischer said the stronger shekel was not a problem, but he also hinted at more intervention. Via WSJ’s Anjali Cordeiro: Fischer said that if the shekel starts to move in directions that aren’t in keeping with the central bank’s estimates of where the market and the economy are, “we will have to intervene.” “We don’t know what the level of intervention is going to be. We hope it will be minimal,” Fischer said, adding that the bank doesn’t publish its views on appropriate levels for the currency. Since then, the shekel has weakened significantly against the dollar. The Bank of Israel’s website states that the interventions are designed to contribute “to the success of the whole economy, to economic growth, and to increased employment,” and that as a result of the policy, “the whole economy reaps the benefit of economic strength, enhanced financial stability, protection against unexpected events, and reduced vulnerability to various crises.” And some of those dollars have ended up in an interesting place. On March 1, the BoI announced that it would actually invest $1.5-2 billion of its reserves in the U.S. stock market. The BoI has faced some internal criticism recently over its interventionism. The State Comptroller’s Office released a particularly negative report last week calling the operations into question. Via the Israeli business daily Globes: Management of the bank’s reserves is conducted in comparison with a benchmark portfolio, known as the numeraire, a hypothetical currency made up of the currencies of Israel’s trading partners. The report criticizes the lack of transparency in setting the makeup of the numeraire, and also mentions that the audit failed to find tools with which the division could measure the overall risk of the reserves portfolio in extreme conditions. It was also found that the foreign currency committee and the narrow monetary committee, two committee’s chaired by Governor of the Bank of Israel that set policy for managing the reserves, have been acting without written procedures regulating their activity and the relationship between them. Those criticisms were obviously not leveled at the Bank’s attempts to weaken the shekel against the dollar. Of course, the Israeli economy is so small, nobody thinks it’s a serious threat to big US industries, but the point remains that China is far from unique in its efforts to control its currency for export purposes. Read more Continue reading

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The Last Days of Lehman Brothers http://

The Last Days of Lehman Brothers http://bit.ly/VehW4S The Last Days of Lehman Brothers – The Movie

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